There’s Still Time for Broccoli!

 

 

Hello, all you fresh-vegetable lovers. This message is for you. If you’re in the San Francisco Bay Area, it’s definitely not too late to grow your own greens. This includes collards, kale and broccoli, known as the Brassica—the mustard family. In fact it might be an excellent time to start them, since when it cools down around here, these veggies thrive and the white moths that obliterate them during the summer months seem to disappear altogether.

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To start, get yourself some organic seeds at a plant shop or supermarket. I recommend you start the sprouts on a sunny windowsill and transplant them outside once you have a true leaf or two. You can put them in the ground or in a planter box with some organic fertilizer and organic chicken or steer manure. Don’t worry about the foggy weather; these guys love it. You’ll be eating fresh broccoli in about six-to-eight weeks. You could be ready to serve them by Thanksgiving. Imagine that!

 

I almost forgot: Brassica includes delicious homegrown cauliflower. It’s the best when it goes straight from garden to table. Come to think of it, it’s the only way I really like cauliflower. It’s gotta be fresh.

 

Let me know how it goes, please.

Stonebridge Potatoes: A Recipe for Friends

 

 

As per request, here’s the recipe for the potatoes in my recent post. They were scrumptious, so you can’t go wrong with this recipe. Modify at will. We do.

 

Ingredients:

3-5 Pounds of fresh, clean potatoes, cut into cubes (skin on)

1-2 Medium carrots, cubed (optional)

1-2 Medium-sized onions or 5-6 shallots to taste, sliced (optional)

1-3 Medium-sized green or red peppers, sliced (almost any variety)

Sea or Kosher Salt

Coarse Black pepper

Fresh parsley (optional)

Olive Oil

 

Pre-heat oven to 375 degrees. On a large backing sheet, generously drizzle olive oil to lightly coat the pan. Place potato cubes on the baking sheet with a flat surface touching the bottom. This will give the potatoes a crispy edge that enhances the dish. Add carrots, too, if you like roasted carrots, which are rather yummy. Add whole, peeled garlic cloves on top. Sprinkle to taste with coarse black pepper and salt. Bake for 35-50 minutes without stirring, or until you can easily stick a fork into a potato.

 

On the stovetop: In a skillet, caramelize sliced onions and peppers in olive oil. Set aside until the potatoes are done.

 

Add a small amount of cooked onion and pepper mixture to the bottom of the bowl and top with potatoes. Add the remaining mixture on top and stir minimally. Sprinkle with fresh parsley, and serve!

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The Sweet Success of Grapes Grown in a Pot!

 

 

Everything I learned about grapes, I learned during my visit to Stonebridge Farm in Colorado, where the viticulture is a force of empowerment and a return to the grow-your-own values of self-reliance and sustainability. Even though I know a bit more than I did when I first put my grapevine in pot, I just mostly like eating out of my garden, so I’m also game to learn all I can about how things work. Before I knew what I didn’t know, I put the grapevine on the front walk. The benefits of this are that I can see it as I come and go and give it attention and water as needed. Plus, it gets full sun for most of the day, while still enjoying the relative shelter of the house, which protects it from wind and inclement weather. What a rush it’s been to see the vine reach up toward the sky like an Olympic champion with her arm held up in triumph. This is the kind crazy wonderfulness that I want to live with every day.

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Our new grapevine is productive and healthy. She grows quickly, but the shape is wrong at least in my mind. (By the way, most producing plants are female to me, just as all cats are female and all dogs males. That’s just how it is for me. Isn’t it the same for everyone?) I’m thinking about how to prune and train her. We have time to work on these things next year once she’s in the ground.

 

I found out from Farmer John that because we don’t add hormones, something that is often done to enlarge commercial grapes, they have a thin, delicate skin, which breaks open with the slightest pressure, releasing their sticky-sweet syrup for a finger-licking delight. They’re simply delicious, but there’s no way they’d make it to market. We had only one cluster to sample this year, but the future seems promising. Our plan is to plant the vine in a sunny spot this fall and let the monsoon do its work.

 

So, the plan is, ahem, rain this fall. (Hope someone out there is listening.)

 

Grapes are just another of the pleasures of urban farming. Soon I’ll be able to add them to the menu when Hal asks, “What’s for dinner?” I can always say, “There are plenty of greens and grapes in the back.” Today there’s mostly a lot of curly and dinosaur kale and collards, but that’s food. The new lettuce is in, and it’s tender and delicious. Next year we might have grapes to go with our blackberries and the new bed of strawberries we put down. Really, you don’t know what you’ll get until you try.

 

Here’s a little peek at grapes growing at Stonebridge Farm in Colorado:

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